Knuth Prize

The Knuth Prize for outstanding contributions to the foundations of computer science is awarded every 1½ years by the ACM Special Interest Group on Algorithms and Computation Theory (ACM-SIGACT) and the IEEE Technical Committee on the Mathematical Foundations of Computing. The Prize includes a $5000 award and a $1000 travel stipend (for travel to the award ceremony) paid by ACM SIGACT and IEEE TCMFC.

The Prize is awarded for major research accomplishments and contributions to the foundations of computer science over an extended period of time. The first Knuth Prize was presented at the 1996 ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing (STOC). Prizes are now awarded alternately at the ACM STOC and the IEEE Conference on Foundations of Computer Science (FOCS).

You can view the current Call for Nominations, which is for the 15th Knuth Prize. The nomination committee is headed by Russell Impagliazzo. Nominations are due on Jan 20, 2015.

The Prize is named in honor and recognition of the extraordinary accomplishments of Prof. Donald Knuth, Emeritus at Stanford University. Prof. Knuth is best known for his ongoing multivolume series, The Art of Computer Programming, which played a critical role in establishing and defining Computer Science as a rigorous, intellectual discipline. Prof. Knuth has also made fundamental contributions to the subfields of analysis of algorithms, compilers, string matching, term rewriting systems, literate programming, and typography. His TeX and MF systems are widely accepted as standards for electronic typesetting. Prof. Knuth's work is distinguished by its integration of theoretical analyses and practical real-world concerns. In his work, theory and practice are not separate components of Computer Science, but rather he shows them to be inexorably linked branches of the same whole.

The Knuth Prize winner is selected by a Prize Committee consisting of six individuals selected by the SIGACT and TCMFC Chairs. In selecting the Knuth Prize winner, the Committee will pay particular attention to a sustained record of high-impact, seminal contributions to the foundations of computer science. The selection may also be partly based on educational accomplishments and contributions such as fundamental textbooks and high-quality students. The award is not based on service work for the community, although service might be included in the citation for a winner if it is appropriate.

Most Recent Winner

Past Winners


Last updated Thu Nov 20 13:26:14 EST 2014 by Amit Chakrabarti.